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T-Mobile: Defense of Dishonesty

Friday, December 1, 2017 in My Opinions and Rantings (Views: 491)
There's an old cliche that goes like this: "It's the cost of doing business". Businesses, like well, even normal people have to account for certain things not to go perfectly, that things may cost more money, time, or resources than planned.

So, in business many things happen. People get sick, companies are short staffed, systems break. All that is part of life and honestly, unavoidable at times. You can't tell someone that you're sorry their mother died, but I need you here - customers will wait. And, a true professional gets this, and can accomodate almost anything if presented the honest truth.

Where the line is drawn is when you are told a lie. Lies come in many forms, they can be told out of ignorance or deceptively. Now, a lie told from ignorance is an easy fix - just give the customer what you promised, it's part of the cost of doing business. Now, if something is so outrageous that it shouldn't be honored, then it's understandable. But at the same time, you would think strict disciplinary action would be part of that as well.

So, to the point. T-Mobile and their lack of integrity has really damaged how much I like them as a company. I know that all companies have fine print that is meant to serve themselves and not the customer so much. Companies have to make money to stay in business, it's a fact of life. But for employees to lie about what that fine print is to make a sale, it's not forgivable.

So, to the next phase. When you complain, do so to the cancellation department. Well, not at T-Mobile. You will get an "I'm sorry", "I understand", "That isn't how we train people", etc. So for the 5 hours of nonsense in trying to fix what T-Mobile broke, their offer back to me was to give me anything that was available to the general public. Needless to say, not working for me. I don't expect much, but a token of "I'm sorry" would help, in other words, meaning what you say.

Some of the lies told to me were on the fine print, how you can buy the device on an initial payment and then just pay it off. Next, how you can't pay it off. Then, no word on having to add a line, or cancel an exising one prior to adding. Seriously, who needs 5 lines for 3 people. Even the "free" tablet I bought came with strings attached. Will this work with the GoGo in flight being a TMobile One Plus customer? Yes. Truth, no. The list goes on...

But I am assured by TMobile's corporate BS (the script they tell people to say), "we are a training company and we'll look into this and make sure others don't go through it". Okay, so what about the fact you wronged me?

One of my favorite charges ever, the upgrade fee. They will charge you $20 every time you buy a new device for the SIM card. This of course, is unavoidable since a SIM comes in every box. Talk about scumbag policy.

Then the hidden restocking fee when I brought it back. What really burns me up is the fact I did return the item because they lied to me within a week. So, you lie to me and then try to screw me out of $75 on top of it?

The more I write, the more TMobile will look bad. Just insure before you do anything with them that the fine print is seen and documented in writing. Also, insure you are buying a phone that isn't loaded down with their crap on it so it will be easier to move to a new carrier.

As a followup, it appears not only was lying crucial to T-Mobile's making a profit off the sale, but also completely screwing up the rate plans. Apparently when T-Mobile store employees go into your account, they are either ill trained, plain stupid, or just spiteful and dishonest about the fact they will just take a machete to your rate plan. When you call the main lines to fix it, they will, but of course, "I'm sorry" doesn't make things better. There is nothing worse in business than a customer who feels cheated.

Needless to say, lesson learned from T-Mobile, don't believe the hype or pretty much anything they say. And if you give money to people you can't trust... Draw your own conclusion.

 

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